Sun on the Pool Los Angeles April 13th 1982
1982

Composite Polaroids

Hockney has long been skeptical about photography’s capacity to make complex art—“I mean, photography is all right if you don’t mind looking at the world from the point of view of a paralyzed Cyclops—for a split second. But that’s not what it’s like to live in the world.” But when curator Alain Sayag convinces him to mount a show of his photographs at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, he has a breakthrough regarding how the medium might be used to create two-dimensional images with the perspectival sophistication of Cubist paintings. To document Hockney’s collection of personal photographs—which number in the thousands—Sayag suggests using a Polaroid camera for making “instant” prints. In short order, Hockney adopts this device to make new artworks: composite Polaroids showing multiple viewpoints in a single work of art. They are an innovation on his method, since the 1970s, of compositing multiple snapshots to plan paintings.

Still Life Blue Guitar 4th April 1982, 1982

The main point was that you read it differently. It wasn’t just a photograph. It was abstracted, stylized: the ideas were based on Cubism in the way that it filters things down to an essence .... It worked so well that I couldn’t believe what was happening when I looked at it. I saw all these different spaces, and I thought: "My God! I’ve never seen anything like this in photography." Then I was at the camera night and day. I bought a thousand dollars of Polaroid film straight away! Within a week I’d done very complex things. I quickly discovered that I didn’t have to match things up at all. In fact, I couldn’t possibly match them, and it wasn’t necessary. The joiners were much closer to the way we actually look at things, closer to the truth of the experience.

Drawing with a Camera

Hockney makes 150 composite Polaroid works by May. In June, he has his first show of them, aptly titled Drawing with a Camera, at André Emmerich Gallery in New York. 

Maurice Payne Reading The New York Times in Los Angeles Feb. 28th 1982, 1982
Alain Sayag Pembroke Studios 28 April 1982, 1982
Nicholas Wilder Studying Picasso. Los Angeles 24th March 1982., 1982
Ann and Byron Upton Pembroke Studios 6th May 1982
Billy and Audrey Wilder, Los Angeles, April 1982
Bing. Saturday 27th Feb. 1982
Celia. Los Angeles. April 10th 1982
Celia with Yellow Flowers, Montcalm Avenue
George Lawson and Wayne Sleep Pembroke Studios London W8, 2 May 1982
Henry Friday 19th March 1982
Kasmin, Los Angeles. 28th March 1982
Mother Bradford Yorkshire 4th May 1982
The Printers at Gemini Los Angeles April 1982
Bing Looking at Picasso 3rd March 1982
Gregory. Los Angeles. March 31st 1982
Unfinished Painting in Finished Photograph(s) April 2nd 1982

The camera is a medium is what I suddenly realized. It’s neither an art, a technique, a craft, nor a hobby—it’s a tool. It’s an extraordinary drawing tool. It’s as if I, like most ordinary photographers, had previously been taking part in some long-established culture in which pencils were only used for making dots—there’s an obvious sense of liberation that comes when you realize that you can make lines!

Brian Los Angeles Sunday 21st March 1982
Garden and Pool Los Angeles Sunday Feb. 28th 1982
Gregory Swimming Los Angeles March 31st 1982
Maurice Payne Montcalm Avenue
Sun on the Pool Los Angeles April 13th 1982
Yellow Chair with Shadow Los Angeles April 18th 1982
Blue Chair with Red Shorts-Observed 13th March 1982
Blue Terrace Los Angeles March 8th 1982
Dagny Corcoran Los Angeles 16th March 1982
A Lot More Rain on the Pool Los Angeles March 6th 1982
A Little More Rain on the Pool Los Angeles March 6th 1982
A Little Bit of Rain on the Pool Los Angeles March 6th 1982
Nathan Swimming Los Angeles March 11th 1982

Pompidou exhibition

The Centre Pompidou exhibition opens in July, and provides an overview of Hockney’s years of personal photographs as well as recent experimentation. Andy Grunberg, writing in the New York Times, notes the [NESTED]impact of the composite Polaroids in light of art history: “By photographing at different angles and distances, Hockney forces a number of perspectival disparities to appear .... Hockney has long admired Picasso; this is as close as he has come yet to paying homage by style.”

It’s as if the medium was fixed in this one way view of the world; photographers seemed to be exclusively concerned with subject matter, and they may not necessarily relate to form the way a painter does. I believe that only an artist’s approach will extend photography as a medium .... The Cubists were deeply involved in depicting reality more accurately than had been previously done, and I think they did in fact succeed. It seems strange that photography was not influenced by Cubism.

It’s as if the medium was fixed in this one way view of the world; photographers seemed to be exclusively concerned with subject matter, and they may not necessarily relate to form the way a painter does. I believe that only an artist’s approach will extend photography as a medium .... The Cubists were deeply involved in depicting reality more accurately than had been previously done, and I think they did in fact succeed. It seems strange that photography was not influenced by Cubism.

Hockney with a Polaroid camera

Polaroid to Pentax

The composite Polaroids, which start with images of Hockney’s house and garden, continue to develop as Hockney travels around the American West and visits Yorkshire in the U.K. Over the year, he varies the technical aspects of making them, [NESTED]replacing the Polaroid camera with the Pentax 110, a miniature interchangeable lens camera that allows him, among other advantages, to avoid white borders around the image. But its film requires a lengthier processing time, and increasingly he plans the arrangement of a photographic collage in notes and diagrams while waiting it out. 

First Expedition to Yosemite, May 1982, 1982
First Expedition to Yosemite, May 1982, 1982

Grand Canyon

Hockney makes trips to the Grand Canyon with his Pentax 110, returning to the studio to map out two-dimensional photographic collages that attempt to give a sense of the lived experience of that spectacular geographic formation: “Memory became part of the process.” 

Grand Canyon from North Rim Lodge, Arizona, August 1982
View of Grand Canyon from North Rim Lodge, Arizona, Sept. 1982
Self Portrait with Beer at the Grand Canyon, Sept. 1982
North Rim, Grand Canyon, Arizona, August, 1982

These early collages of the Grand Canyon were really more like studies, you did them, just as you do a drawing sometimes, to teach yourself something; it doesn’t matter what they look like when they’re finished, that’s not why they were made. In this case, in retrospect, I realize I was training my visual memory, and this took a lot of time.

Trees in Bryce Canyon, Utah, Sept. 1982
David and Ann, Bryce Canyon, Utah, Sept. 1982
Bryce Point, Utah, Sept. 1982
Bing Gazing at Bryce Canyon, Utah, Sept. 1982
Bryce Canyon, Utah, Sept. 1982
Young Photographer, Bryce Canyon, Utah, Sept. 1982

I’ve always loved the wide-open spaces of the American West. But I was never able to capture them in photography, to convey the sense of what it’s actually like to be there, facing that expanse—that incredible sense of spaciousness, which is somehow as elusive to ordinary photography as time is. I thought that among other things, this new kind of photography might be able to capture that sense of vast extent.

Ann Sitting by Pool, Hurricane, Utah, Sept. 1982
Ann, Byron and Bing Bathing in the Virgin River, Sept. 1982

Exhibitions

Solo

  • David Hockney: Paper Pools, Galería Alençon, Madrid (Jan).
  • Hockney and Poetry, Michael Parkin Fine Art, London (May 12–Jun 12); catalogue with texts by Michael Parkin and Mark Glazebrook.
  • Drawing with a Camera, André Emmerich Gallery, New York (Jun 3–25).
  • David Hockney: Drawing with a Camera, L.A. Louver, Venice, CA (Jun 10–Jul 3).
  • Composite Polaroids, Knoedler Gallery, London (Jun 29–Jul 31).
  • David Hockney photographe, Musée national d’art moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (Jul 7–Sep 12); catalogue with texts by Alain Sayag and David Hockney; English edition: Photographs, London: Petersburg Press.
  • Sources and Experiments, Sewall Art Gallery, Rice University, Houston (Sep 7–Oct 15); catalogue with a text by Esther de Vécsey.
  • Drawings and Photographs of China, Knoedler Gallery, London (Nov 2–Dec 4).
  • Incisioni, litografie, manifesti, libri, La Libreria Giulia, Rome (opens Dec 3).
  • New Work, André Emmerich Gallery, New York (Dec).
  • David Hockney: Drawings and Graphics, Susan Gersh Gallery, Los Angeles (Dec).

Group

  • Eight Lithographs to Benefit the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles (Jan 15–Feb 13).
  • Aspects of British Art Today, Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum, Tokyo (Feb 27–Apr 11); organized with the British Council; travels to Tochigi Prefectural Museum of Fine Arts (Apr 24–May 30); National Museum of Modern Art, Osaka (Jun 12–Jul 25); Fukuoka Art Museum (Aug 7–29); Hokkaido Museum of Modern Art, Sapporo (Sep 9–Oct 9).
  • Brooke Alexander Publications 1971–1981, L.A. Louver, Venice, CA (Mar 2–27).
  • 1960–1980: Attitudes/Concepts/Images, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (Apr 9–Jul 11); catalogue.
  • Painting: American–European, L.A. Louver, Venice, CA (Aug 10–Sep 25)
  • Carnegie International, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh (Oct 23, 1982–Jan 2, 1983); travels to Seattle Art Museum, WA (Feb 10–Mar 27); Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth (Jun–Nov); National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; catalogue.
  • Painter as Photographer, John Hansard Art Gallery, Southampton (Nov–Dec), touring exhibition organized by the Arts Council of Great Britain; travels to Wolverhampton; Oxford; Exeter; Nottingham; Camden Arts Centre, London; Brighton; Windsor; Bradford.
  • Paper as Image, Sunderland Arts Centre (Nov–Dec); touring exhibition organized by the Arts Council of Great Britain; travels to Cambridge, Bangor, Nottingham, Southampton, Brighton, and London.

Publication

Publication

  • David Hockney and Stephen Spender, China Diary, London: Thames & Hudson; New York: Harry N. Abrams.