Views of Hotel Well III
1984

Christopher and Don

Hockney calls the vast canvas A Visit with Christopher and Don, Santa Monica Canyon—six feet high and twenty wide—“the most complicated painting I’ve ever done.” It attests to his study of Chinese scrolls, with nonlinear narratives playing out across expanses of two-dimensional space.

A Visit with Christopher and Don, Santa Monica Canyon, 1984

I was trying to create a painting where the viewer’s eye could be made to move in certain ways, stop in certain places, move on, and in so doing reconstruct the space across time for itself .... The problem was how to prevent the eye from stopping, from getting stuck. For instance, that’s why both Don and Christopher are rendered transparently. When you look at Christopher, you see him, but when you move along the bedroom and you’re looking at the bed, he dissolves in a sense into patterns of green and blue and red paint.

Hockney painting

Painting in close-up

After his prolonged focus on theater design and photography in recent years, paintings are once more a significant portion in Hockney’s output. His fascination with Cubism, explored in his photographic collages, evolves into paintings of his friends and loved ones observed in extreme close-up.

Celia I
Celia II
Celia (Eyes, Nose & Lips in Blue & Pink)
Celia III
Celia with Her Foot on a Chair
Christopher with His Glasses On
Christopher without His Glasses On
Christopher with Glasses, Blue Shirt, Green Background

Have you ever noticed how when you look at things close up, you sometimes shut one eye—that is, you make yourself like a camera? Otherwise, things start to swim .... The Cubists, you know, didn’t shut their eyes. People complain about Picasso—how he distorted the human face. I don’t think there are any distortions at all. For instance, those marvelous portraits of his lover Marie-Thérèse Walter which he made during the thirties—he must have spent hours with her in bed, very close, looking at her face. A face looked at like that does look different from one seen at five or six feet. Strange things begin to happen to the eyes, the cheeks, the nose—wonderful inversions and repetitions. Certain distortions appear, but they can’t be distortions, because they’re reality. Those paintings are about that kind of intimate seeing.

Conversation in the Studio
Two Pembroke Studio Chairs
The Perspective Lesson
Amaryllis in Vase
Pembroke Studio Interior
Tyler Dining Room
Pembroke Studio with Blue Chairs and Lamp
Red Celia
Celia with Green Hat
Hotel Acatlan: First Day
Hotel Acatlan: Second Day
An Image of Gregory
An Image of Celia
Views of Hotel Well I
Views of Hotel Well III
An Image of Celia, State I
An Image of Celia, State II
Walking Past Two Chairs
Portrait of Mother I
An Image of Ken
Hotel Acatlan: Two Weeks Later
Views of Hotel Well II
Portrait of Mother II
A Picture of Two Chairs
Number One Chair
White Porcelain

Hotel Acatlán

Hockney returns to paint the courtyard of the Hotel Romano Angeles in rural Mexico, which he discovered, to his delight, when his car broke down nearby earlier in the year. [NESTED]Filled with luxuriant plant life, it becomes the subject of a series of paintings he completes in his Los Angeles studio, as well as lithographs that he drafts on site using a new method introduced to him by the printer Ken Tyler, which involves layering transparent Mylar sheets to plan an image’s color registration. 

I am now doing a painting of a courtyard of a Mexican hotel. I loved the space of it when I first discovered it, and went back to stay five days. It has so many different perspectives that you are forced to move your eye constantly over the surface of the canvas. It is a totally impossible view from one point, yet there is clarity and order about the picture. The effect of space is extremely strong, yet it is not an illusion you want to walk in to—because you are already in the picture and walking round—every viewer so far feels this. This is also the effect of seeming to soften the edges of the canvas—you are not looking through a hole .... Like the photographs, there is no way it can all be seen easily or at once, yet it is always recognizable as a courtyard. In short, the only way it can be seen all at once is as an abstraction, which is what it is, as are all things on a flat surface.

I am now doing a painting of a courtyard of a Mexican hotel. I loved the space of it when I first discovered it, and went back to stay five days. It has so many different perspectives that you are forced to move your eye constantly over the surface of the canvas. It is a totally impossible view from one point, yet there is clarity and order about the picture. The effect of space is extremely strong, yet it is not an illusion you want to walk in to—because you are already in the picture and walking round—every viewer so far feels this. This is also the effect of seeming to soften the edges of the canvas—you are not looking through a hole .... Like the photographs, there is no way it can all be seen easily or at once, yet it is always recognizable as a courtyard. In short, the only way it can be seen all at once is as an abstraction, which is what it is, as are all things on a flat surface.

A Walk around the Hotel Courtyard, Acatlan, 1985
Hotel Acatlan, 2 Weeks Later
Hotel Romano Angeles Acatlan Feb. 1984
Hotel Romano Angeles, Acatlan
Views of Hotel Well I
Views of Hotel Well III
Black and white photographs by Jim McHugh

Nude, 17th June 1984

Hockey continues to advance his theories about how various modes of representation might be complicated through photography, for example by making a photocollage of the actress Theresa Russell playing Marilyn Monroe posing naked for a centerfold shot. Hockney divides Russell’s body up by taking myriad shots of it, then reassembles her full figure as Nude, 17th June 1984. [NESTED]This photographic collage was made after film director Nicolas Roeg approached Hockney about creating a work to feature in his film Insignificance (1985).

Only erotic photographs inspire you immediately to look for more than 30 seconds, and my pin-up requires you to look very slowly, you are forced to move over every inch of her body, which makes it more interesting, more erotic.

Only erotic photographs inspire you immediately to look for more than 30 seconds, and my pin-up requires you to look very slowly, you are forced to move over every inch of her body, which makes it more interesting, more erotic.

Nude, 17th June 1984, 1984

Exhibitions

Solo

  • David Hockney: Photocollages, Greenberg Gallery, St. Louis (Mar 24–Apr 21).
  • Ausgewählte Druckgrafik, Knoedler Gallery, Zurich (Apr 14–May 5).
  • Print Retrospective, Thordén Wetterling Galleries, Stockholm (Apr 28–Jun 6); travels to Thordén Wetterling Galleries, Gothenburg (Sep 8–Oct 10).
  • Photo-Composites, Milwaukee Art Museum (May 31–Sep 20).
  • Prints, Mira Godard Gallery, Toronto (Jun).
  • Hockney’s Progress, Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal (Jun 30–Sep 2).
  • David Hockney: Photo-collages, Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco (Jul 25–Sep 1).
  • David Hockney: Lithographs and Photocollages, Galerie Esperanza, Montreal, Canada (Sep).
  • New Work, Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago (Sep 8–30).
  • David Hockney, Associated American Artists Gallery, New York (Sep–Oct).
  • Salon Exhibition, 15 Years, Marianne Deson Gallery, Chicago (Sep 14–Oct 16).
  • New Work: Paintings, Gouaches, Drawings, Photo Collages, André Emmerich Gallery, New York (Oct 13–Nov 3); catalogue.
  • Photographic Collages, Carpenter + Hochman Gallery, Dallas (opens Dec 13).

Group

  • The Folding Image: Screens by Western Artists of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (Mar 4–Sep 3); travels to Yale University Art Gallery (Oct 11, 1984–Jan 6, 1985); catalogue.
  • Drawings, 1974–1984, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C. (Mar 15–May 13); catalogue.
  • The Figure in Contemporary Art, Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College, Lynchburg, VA (Mar 18–Apr 15).
  • Olympian Gestures, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Jun 7–Oct 7).
  • Reading Drawings: A Selection from the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, The Drawing Center, New York (Jun–Jul).
  • American/European Painting, Drawing, and Sculpture, L.A. Louver, Venice, CA (Jul 20–Aug 22).
  • The Proper Study: Contemporary Figurative Paintings from Britain, Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, India (Dec 1–31); travels to Jehangir Nicholson Museum of Modern Art, National Centre for Performing Arts, Bombay (Feb 1–28, 1985).

Publication

Publication

  • David Hockney: Cameraworks, with a text by Lawrence Weschler, London: Thames & Hudson; New York: Alfred A. Knopf.