Dog Painting 13
1995

Dog Paintings

Hockney watched numerous friends die over the preceding years, but the death of Henry Geldzahler affects him greatly. He retreats to Malibu with his canine friends [NESTED]where he completes a series of drawings and paintings of his beloved dachshunds, Stanley and Boodgie.

I wanted desperately to paint something loving .... I felt such a loss of love I wanted to deal with it in some way. I realized I was painting my best friends, Stanley and Boodgie. They sleep with me; I’m always with them here. They don’t go anywhere without me and only occasionally do I leave them. They’re like little people to me. The subject wasn’t dogs but my love of the little creatures.

I wanted desperately to paint something loving .... I felt such a loss of love I wanted to deal with it in some way. I realized I was painting my best friends, Stanley and Boodgie. They sleep with me; I’m always with them here. They don’t go anywhere without me and only occasionally do I leave them. They’re like little people to me. The subject wasn’t dogs but my love of the little creatures.

Hockney with his dog paintings
Dog Painting 1
Dog Painting 2
Dog Painting 3
Dog Painting 4
Dog Painting 5
Dog Painting 6
Dog Painting 7
Dog Painting 8
Dog Painting 9
Dog Painting 9A
Dog Painting 10
Dog Painting 11
Dog Painting 12
Dog Painting 13
Dog Painting 14
Dog Painting 15
Dog Painting 16
Dog Painting 17
Dog Painting 18
Dog Painting 19
Dog Painting 20
Dog Painting 21
Dog Painting 22
Dog Painting 23
Dog Painting 24
Dog Painting 25
Dog Painting 26
Dog Painting 27
Dog Painting 28
Dog Painting 29
Dog Painting 30
Dog Painting 31
Dog Painting 32
Dog Painting 33
Dog Painting 34
Dog Painting 35
Dog Painting 36
Dog Painting 37
Dog Painting 38
Dog Painting 39
Dog Painting 40
Dog Painting 41
Dog Painting 42
Dog Painting 43
Dog Painting 44
Dog Painting 45
Dog Painting 46
Dog Painting 47
Hockney taking Stanley and Boodgie for a walk

Drawing retrospective

In Hamburg at the Kunsthalle, a major retrospective of Hockney’s drawing is tremendously popular, bringing in over 40,000 visitors before it travels to the Royal Academy of Arts in London and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

In the courtyard of the RA, during the drawing retrospective, a BMW Art Car by Hockney is on view, which features elements of landscape and figure painting on its body.

BMW Hockney Art Car 850 Ci, 1995

Painting as Performance

In his studio, he is deeply engaged across a range of genres, from flower paintings and pet portraits to more experimental works that investigate the nature of seeing. The series Painting as Performance develops from the Painted Environments of two years prior, but now Hockney is involving theatrical lighting effects in the making and display of composite images—photographing works in progress under various lights, printing the images, and further manipulating them through more painting and photography. Exemplary among these works is Snail’s Space, which measures seven by twenty feet. It is, according to William Wilson’s review in the Los Angeles Times, “a superbly realized painting for painting’s sake, like a symphony that constantly reinvents its own harmonics.”

Snail's Space with Vari-Lites, "Painting as Performance", 1996
Near Bruges, 1995

Snail’s Space changed quite a bit. The original painting is on two canvases measuring 84 by 240 inches, but I decided to continue the painting on the floor immediately in front of it, so we constructed a three-dimensional extension using real cubes, cones, and cylinders. Then I decided to experiment with computer-controlled lighting, the type they use at pop concerts, to physically change the appearance of colors within the painting. It demands a dark room to start with; we then arranged a computer program of subtle light changes lasting around eight minutes. I called it Painting as Performance, meaning if you put a sequence of lights on it, it is passing through time, which in turn means a performance. From when it begins to when it stops, it is theater and painting combined.

Extending Path, 1995

Digital Inkjet Prints

Hockney turns again to photography and plays with layers of illusion and reality. Using an 8x10 camera, Hockney photographs his own artwork and makes digital scans of the transparencies. The photographs are then printed by Nash Editions in Los Angeles on Somerset heavyweight paper using an inkjet printer. [NESTED]Three different, but connected, series emerge from this episode using a single viewpoint: current work in the studio, particularly Snail’s Space; flower paintings with their motifs; and a group exhibition in Munich entitled Pierrot, Melancholie und Maske where the Punchinellos from Hockney’s 1980 stage designs for Parade come to life and take over the gallery space. The three groupings are published by the David Hockney Studio in 1996 in a book entitled 20 Photographs.

It seems to me to be the most beautiful printing of photography I have seen. The colour of the paper seems almost physical. The surface of the paper itself is beautiful …. it will slowly change like everything else. What’s the point of an ugly piece of paper that will last forever?

It seems to me to be the most beautiful printing of photography I have seen. The colour of the paper seems almost physical. The surface of the paper itself is beautiful …. it will slowly change like everything else. What’s the point of an ugly piece of paper that will last forever?

Sleeping Guard with Possible Thief. 30 and 31st Oct 1995., 1995
The Studio March 16th 1995
First Detail. Snails Space March 25th 1995
Second Detail. Snails Space March 25th 1995
Third Detail Snails Space March 25th 1995
Fourth Detail Snails Space March 27th 1995
Fifth Detail Snails Space March 27th 1995
The Studio March 28th 1995
Photograph of a Photograph with Photograph of Painting and Motif. July 10th 1995
Roses for Mother 4 Dec 1995.
Punchinellos Hanging Picture of Harlequin. 30 and 31st Oct 1995.
The Largest Wall Arranged by Punchinellos. 30 and 31st Oct 1995.
Two Walls with Corner. 30 and 31st Oct 1995.
Shadow Assisting Punchinello 30 and 31st Oct 1995.
Sleeping Guard with Possible Thief. 30 and 31st Oct 1995.
Melancholy Punchinello. 30 and 31st Oct. 1995.
Punchinello as a Useful Modern Sign. 30 and 31st Oct 1995.
Shadow Pulling the Ground from Under. 30 and 31st Oct 1995.
Looking at Punchinellos Entering a Room and Picture 30 and 31st Oct 1995.

Claude Monet in Chicago

Late in the year, at the Art Institute of Chicago, Hockney is deeply affected by an exhibition of the work of Claude Monet (French, 1840-1926), another painter [NESTED]who captured light’s delicate atmospheric presence. 

You don’t need an art critic to tell you Monet was a great artist. You can see it yourself; you absolutely can. I came out of that exhibition and it made me look everywhere, everywhere intensely. That little shadow on Michigan Avenue, the light hitting the leaf. I thought: "My god, now I’ve seen that. He’s made me see it." Most people don’t see things like that. They can’t get pleasure like that, can they? Monet gives it to you though, for he was a generous spirit, and you can then take pleasure in looking at things freshly.

You don’t need an art critic to tell you Monet was a great artist. You can see it yourself; you absolutely can. I came out of that exhibition and it made me look everywhere, everywhere intensely. That little shadow on Michigan Avenue, the light hitting the leaf. I thought: "My god, now I’ve seen that. He’s made me see it." Most people don’t see things like that. They can’t get pleasure like that, can they? Monet gives it to you though, for he was a generous spirit, and you can then take pleasure in looking at things freshly.

The Fish
Peeled Lemon with Slices
One Apple and a Bowl of Pears
Cauliflower Carrots Broccoli and Cabbage
Fruit and Walnuts
Four Apples and a Pear
Artichokes
The Vittel Bottle
Sunflowers
Flowers Sent as a Gift
Purple Potted Flower

Exhibitions

Solo

  • David Hockney, Alan Cristea Gallery, London (Jan 11–Feb 11).
  • Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy, Brighton Museum and Art Gallery (Mar 28–May 14); travels to Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery (May 20–Jul 2) and Manchester City Art Galleries (Jul 8–Sep 3); catalogue.
  • Some Large New Paintings and Twenty-Five Dogs Upstairs, L.A. Louver, Venice, CA (Apr 7–May 6); catalogue.
  • David Hockney, Nishimura Gallery, Tokyo (Apr 24–May 20).
  • David Hockney Dog Paintings, 1853 Gallery, Saltaire (Jun 26–Oct 1).
  • Zeichnungen 1954–1994/A Drawing Retrospective, Hamburger Kunsthalle (Aug 22–Oct 22); travels to Royal Academy of Arts, London (Nov 7, 1995–Jan 28, 1996) and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Feb 15–Apr 28, 1996); catalogue with texts by Ulrich Luckhardt and Paul Melia.
  • David Hockney, Gemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl, New York (Sep 14–Oct 31).
  • Paintings and Photographs of Paintings, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam (Oct 28, 1995–Jan 21, 1996); travels to Kunsthaus Wien (Feb 8–Apr 14, 1996).

Group

  • In a Different Light, University of California Art Museum, Berkeley, (Jan 11–Apr 9).
  • Art Works: The PaineWebber Collection of Contemporary Masters, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (Jun 2–Sep 24); travels to Detroit Institute of Arts (Oct 29–Dec 31); Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Mar 14–Jun 9, 1996); Minneapolis Institute of Arts (Jun 30–Sep 15, 1996); San Diego Museum of Art (Oct 16, 1996–Jan 5, 1997); Center for the Arts, Miami (Mar 13–May 25, 1997); catalogue.
  • 46th Venice Biennale, Venice (Jun 11–Oct 15); catalogue.
  • Unser Jahrhundert: Menschenbilder, Bilderwelten, Museum Ludwig, Cologne (Jul 9–Oct 8); catalogue.
  • Pierrot: Melancholie und Maske, Haus der Kunst, Munich (Sep 15–Dec 3); catalogue.

Publications

Publications

  • David Hockney, edited by Paul Melia with texts by Nannette Aldred, Andrew Causey, Simon Faulkner, William Hardie, and Alan Woods, Manchester: Manchester University Press.
  • Peter Clothier, Modern Masters: David Hockney, New York: Abbeville Press.

Honor

Honor

  • Honorary Doctorate, University of Oxford.