Ken Bradford. London. 20th December 1999 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
2000

Writing Secret Knowledge

Hockney begins writing an art historical book detailing his research—via the visual rather than the written record—into the use of optical devices by the Old Masters. The project demonstrates his longtime fascination with the interplay of painting and photography in picture-making. With the input of art historians and scientists, he performs experiments to reconstruct how, in many masterpieces, the depiction of space was achieved through the projection onto a surface of a subject’s image via lens, which artists then traced and otherwise manipulated. In his Los Angeles studio, he creates The Great Wall of images charting five centuries of artistic development in the West, from the “pre-optics” of Byzantine mosaics (c. 1150) to an 1889 Post-Impressionist portrait by Vincent van Gogh. 

The Great Wall, 2000

The photographic moment

Using high-quality color photocopies, Hockney arranges the portraits chronologically on a horizontal axis (early to late, left to right) and geographically on a vertical axis (transitioning from Northern European works at the top to those from Southern Europe at the bottom). With The Great Wall assembled, he is able to pinpoint the moment in time, circa 1430, when artists began using optical devices, first apparently in Bruges with Jan van Eyck’s Portrait of Giovanni(?) Arnolfini and His Wife. Hockney realizes that portraiture from [NESTED]that moment going forward took on a photographic quality until the advent of printed photography around 1825 when painters began to loosen up.

Detail of The Great Wall
Detail of The Great Wall

Optical devices are just tools. They don’t make marks, they don’t make the painting. You can draw using optical devices—and it actually is drawing, that is, an imaginative treatment of what you are dealing with. It’s not just tracing something. In any case, I’m not suggesting that these artists projected a whole picture, then just traced it. That’s not how it was done at all. I think Caravaggio made a sort of collage of elements pieced together very, very cleverly, very creatively. But it would have taken quite a bit of time to work out. Using a camera doesn’t diminish these artists at all. No lens could see the whole picture of Vermeer’s The Art of Painting, with everything in focus. No lens today could; no lens ever could.

Camera lucida portraits

Hockney grows increasingly proficient at using the camera lucida, and a show of these intricate drawings opens in late April at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, [NESTED]Likeness: Recent Portrait Drawings by David Hockney.

Now, for someone like me, trained in the conventional Carracci tradition—you know, plumb line, the extended thumb, gauging relative proportions and so forth—those pencil portraits of Ingres were mind-boggling. For one thing their size—how small they turn out to be when you see them in person. The images are ... incredibly detailed and incredibly assured. If you draw at all, you know that’s very rare and not at all easy.

Now, for someone like me, trained in the conventional Carracci tradition—you know, plumb line, the extended thumb, gauging relative proportions and so forth—those pencil portraits of Ingres were mind-boggling. For one thing their size—how small they turn out to be when you see them in person. The images are ... incredibly detailed and incredibly assured. If you draw at all, you know that’s very rare and not at all easy.

12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style, 2000

12 Portraits after Ingres

For the exhibition, Encounters: New Art from Old, the National Gallery in London asks 24 artists of international renown to create original artworks reflecting the museum’s permanent collection. Hockney, who has been deeply invested in Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingre’s small, delicately observed drawings of people since thrice visiting an exhibition of the neoclassical painter’s work at the Royal Academy the previous year, contributes drawings of the National Gallery’s security guards made with the assistance of his camera lucida: 12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style. With the guards themselves often near to the work within the gallery, visitors are able to assess the likenesses achieved firsthand.

Devlin Crow. London. 11th January 2000 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Pravin Patel. London. 5th January 2000 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Katherine Dooley. London. 6th January 2000 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Graham Eve. London. 7th January 2000 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Brian Wedlake. London. 10th January 2000 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Lena James. London. 3rd January 2000 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Ron Lillywhite. London. 17th December 1999 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Maria Vasquez. London. 21st December 1999 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Ken Bradford. London. 20th December 1999 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Jack Kettlewell. London. 13th December 1999 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Fazila Jhungoor. London. 18th December 1999 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"
Vincent Simon. London. 16th December 1999 from "12 Portraits after Ingres in a Uniform Style"

Painting in London and Los Angeles

Staying in London through the summer, Hockney paints portraits, scenes from East Yorkshire, his studio garden, and recollected images of his Los [NESTED] Angeles garden and the Californian scenery. By September he returns to L.A. where he continues the theme of painting his surroundings, including the garden at his home and studio.

Going Up Garrowby Hill, 2000
Going Up Garrowby Hill, 2000
Studio View. London. July 2000
My Garden in Los Angeles, London, July 2000
Pierre Saint-Jean, London, June 2000
Stephen Harwood, London, June 2000
Maurice Payne, London, July 2000
The Gate, 2000
Red Pots in the Garden
Guest House Wall
Italian Cypress
Guest House Garden
Self Portrait. Los Angeles. October 5, 2000, 2000

Exhibitions

Solo

  • Visions and Revisions, Pillsbury and Peters Fine Art, Dallas (Jan 8– Feb 26); catalogue.
  • Likeness: Recent Portrait Drawings by David Hockney, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (Apr 25–Jun 4).
  • David Hockney, Leslie Sacks Fine Art, Los Angeles (Apr 29–May 27).
  • David Hockney, L.A. Louver, Venice, CA (Jul 14–Aug 12).
  • A Print Retrospective 1961–1999, Alan Cristea Gallery, London (Sep 12–Oct 14); catalogue.
  • David Hockney: Etchings and Lithographs 1965–1988, Lumley Cazalet, London (Nov 17–Dec 22).

Group

  • Modern Art Despite Modernism, Museum of Modern Art, New York (Mar 16–Jul 16); catalogue.
  • How You Look at It: Fotografien des 20. Jahrhunderts, Sprengel Museum, Hanover (May 14–Jun 8); travels to Städtische Galerie im Städelschen Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt am Main (Aug 23–Dec 11); catalogue.
  • Encounters: New Art from Old, National Gallery, London (Jun 12–Sep 17); catalogue.
  • American Perspectives: Photographs from the Polaroid Collection, Metropolitan Museum of Photography, Tokyo (Sep 12–Nov 12); catalogue.
  • Celebrating Modern Art: The Anderson Collection, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco (Oct 2000–Jan 2001); catalogue.
  • Telling Time, National Gallery, London (Oct 18, 2000–Jan 14, 2001); catalogue.
  • Made in California: Art, Image, and Identity, 1900–2000, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Oct 22, 2000–Feb 25, 2001); catalogue.
  • Painting the Century: 101 Portrait Masterpieces 1900–2000, National Portrait Gallery, London (Oct 26, 2000–Feb 4, 2001); catalogue.
  • Then and Now, Bradford Gallery and Cartwright Hall Gallery, Bradford (Nov 25, 2000–Feb 11, 2001).

Honor

Honor

  • Freedom of the City of Bradford Award, University of Bradford.